Ghana: Developing cocoa and associated crops through the Sankofa Project empowered by Alliances for Action

    Overview

    Summary

    Since 2016, ITC in cooperation with its partners- Chocolats Halba (Coop), the Kuapa Kokoo Farmer Union, Niche Cocoa,  Max Havelaar Foundation, Fairtrade Africa, Yam Development Council of Ghana and the Government of Ghana have been working together to achieve transformative impact by supporting smallholder cocoa farmers in Ghana and their families to improve their livelihoods through income diversification and adoption of climate smart agriculture. To date, several thousands of dollars have been jointly invested by value chain operators. As a result, lead farmer revenues have increased by 22% on the average, and the project secured new commercial partnerships and markets for yam and associated crops. In addition, the Kuapa Kokoo Farmer Union is now mainstreaming the adoption of improved climate risk mitigation and adaptation practices.  The scaling up plan for 2019-2023 aims to increase living income, improving cocoa  and associated crops productivity & quality, while reducing the over dependency on mono cropping production systems. The ultimate aim is to contribute to 3 pillars of sustainable livelihoods (social, economic and environmental) of stakeholders in the cocoa and associated crops value chains through a multi-stakeholder approach on income diversification, climate resilience and biodiversity conservation. 

    Recipients

    Partners

    Sustainable Development Goals

    This project contributes to the following Sustainable Development Goals, as defined by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

    Social media

    We are balancing our climate-smart approach with indigenous knowledge
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    Climate-smart farming with indigenous knowledge.

    ITC is working with Ghanian cocoa farmers to help them raise and diversify their incomes in the face of the unfolding climate crises. Changing patterns of sun and rain are disrupting their normal growing patterns, so we are balancing our climate-smart approach with indigenous knowledge to help small-holding farmers to:

    • Help maintain biodiversity
    • Enhance food security
    • Protect natural resources
    • Enable carbon capture
    • Improve soil management
    • Diversify cropping systems

    We do this through a layered approach where we strengthen alliances all along the production line, from bean to bar, fostering entrepreneurship and assisting with better market access. Sankofa translates to ‘Go back and get it’ from the Twi language of Ghana. Our Alliances for Sankofa project is reaching into past local customs to pave the way for a better economic future for Ghana’s cocoa farmers. Organic farming without the use of pesticides or chemicals, and food forests rather than monoculture are all examples of indigenous practices we are trying to revive and improve with modern science.

    The rains used to come on time, so planting was easy. But over the last four years, cocoa planting has become hard. The sun is burning too much and killing the plants. Currently if we visit both my farms, all the cocoa is dead. This is the greatest challenge for me as a farmer.
    The rains used to come on time, so planting was easy. But over the last four years, cocoa planting has become hard. The sun is burning too much and killing the plants. Currently if we visit both my farms, all the cocoa is dead. This is the greatest challenge for me as a farmer.
    Dorcas Koomson
    Cocoa farmer from Beposo in the Ahafo region of Ghana
    If we increase our income, we can make enough savings to take care of our basic needs and health.
    If we increase our income, we can make enough savings to take care of our basic needs and health.
    John Narh
    Farmer from Alavanyo in the Volta region of Ghana
    In Ghana now there’s a whole movement of support for #madeinGhana goods and #consumeGhana. There’s a lot of pride and ownership for Ghanaian-made goods, and that’s really exciting because it serves to drive us to innovate more.
    In Ghana now there’s a whole movement of support for #madeinGhana goods and #consumeGhana. There’s a lot of pride and ownership for Ghanaian-made goods, and that’s really exciting because it serves to drive us to innovate more.
    Mary Dickson
    R&D Manager, Niche Cocoa Industry Ltd, Ghana
    Our goal is to add value to cocoa before we export to international markets, improve the livelihoods of cocoa farmers, bring in foreign exchange, create employment, as well as bring technical know-how into the country.
    Our goal is to add value to cocoa before we export to international markets, improve the livelihoods of cocoa farmers, bring in foreign exchange, create employment, as well as bring technical know-how into the country.
    Edmund Poku
    CEO, Niche Cocoa Industry Ltd, Ghana
    Private sector and public sector need to work together. Networking and partnerships are key. And if you see the cocoa sector as one of the critical sectors, we must come together to make sure it works.
    Private sector and public sector need to work together. Networking and partnerships are key. And if you see the cocoa sector as one of the critical sectors, we must come together to make sure it works.
    Seth Twum-Akwaboah
    CEO, Association of Ghana Industries (AGI)

    Video

    25 February 2022

    ITC contact

    Federica
    Angelucci
    Email
    fangelucci [at] intracen.org